Tag Archives: cold process soap

It’s Soap Day!

This week is our school district’s Fall Break. Fall break–seriously? Kiddos get a week off at the beginning of October around here. Um…didn’t school just start?

Well, I decided, why not? I wouldn’t mind a week off, so let’s just jump on that band wagon. Yep. We’re taking the week off.

I have a quick meeting this afternoon, but once I get home, I’m making soap! The first soap will be a peppermint soap with coconut oil, olive oil, and deer tallow. That’s right–I’m using the deer. Wish me luck.

The second soap will be a hot process 100% coconut oil laundry bar that will be shredded up for a huge batch of laundry soap. I’m hoping to do a post on both.

What are you soaping or crafting today?

Cold Process Soap vs. Shampoo – Washing a Dog

Over the last few days, Ellie has gotten dirty. Filthy, actually. We’ve been working on getting the backyard ready for planting this year, and that’s involved mowing down a bunch pasture grass and weeds. Ellie thought this was the greatest thing ever, and she rolled around in the freshly cut grass/weeds. Seeds, leaves, twigs, dirt, and who-knows-what-else got caught in her fur.

DSC_0003

Weston and I have horrible allergies and asthma, and it was clear if Ellie was going to come inside she was going to need a bath. We came to this realization last night, and it was too late to run to the store for dog shampoo. What were we going to do?

Since we brought Ellie home, I’ve been searching for a cold process soap recipe for dogs. They have a ph that’s naturally higher than ours (dog’s ph is about 6.2 – 7.4, and ours is 5.5 – 5.6) , and that’s why you shouldn’t use regular shampoo on them. It dries their skin and hair out, and it makes them itchy.

Cold process soap has a naturally high ph. In fact, one human shampoo bar recipe I found includes citric acid to lower the ph and make it more gentle for humans. Is seems weird to write human so many times…anywho…

Right now I am concocting a doggy cold process shampoo bar recipe. I will post it when I’m happy with it. Last night, however, we didn’t have a doggy shampoo bar, so we used one of my dye free, unscented, goat’s milk bars that was made from coconut, olive, and canola oils. It worked so well! She is so soft, fluffy, and white this morning!

Ellie, the morning after her bath.
Ellie, the morning after her bath.

 

Coffee and Peppermint Goat’s Milk Scrub Soap: Super Grease Fighter

Let me start by saying that this isn’t a pretty soap. It might have been pretty if I’d done a little layering and sliced it, but I made this soap to be more functional than beautiful. If you’re looking for a soap to get auto grease off your husband’s hands, then this is the soap for you.

Last night Jake came home with some sort of industrial grease on his hands, and this stuff didn’t want to come off. My orange paprika soap usually does the job, and I was baffled when it didn’t take it off. Jake was the one that thought to use my kitchen scrub. Not only did it take it off, but it did it fast. Now, I wasn’t going to post my ugly soap, but since my husband loved it so much, I thought you might like it too!

CoffeeScrubSoap

You must use caution when working with lye. Wear goggles and long gloves, don’t breath in the fumes, and make absolutely sure there are no children or pets in your work area. If you’ve never made cold process soap before, please read up on it before attempting this or any project. 

Ingredients:

8.8 oz canola oil

6.6 oz coconut oil

6.6 oz olive oil

3.06 oz sodium hydroxide (lye) 5% Superfat

7.26 oz frozen goat’s milk (slushy is good)

.48 oz peppermint essential oil

cocoa powder (I start with about a tsp, and then add more if I want it darker)

ground coffee (start with a tablespoon, and then add more if you want it grittier)

2 lb loaf mold or small individual molds

stick blender

safety gear

Though this recipe has been calculated carefully, it’s always a good idea to double check any recipe with a lye calculator. 

To make the soap:

1. Line your mold with freezer paper (you don’t need to do this if you’re using silicone).

2. Put on your gloves and goggles.

3. Fill your kitchen sink with ice, nest a heat safe bowl (not aluminum) in the ice and add your frozen goat’s milk. Carefully, and slowly, sprinkle some of the lye over the goat’s milk. Stir well, and then sprinkle some more. Keep stirring and sprinkling until you’ve added all the lye. Stir very, very well until you are absolutely sure the lye has dissolved. Set the mixture in a safe place to cool.

4. In a separate, large, non-aluminum bowl, melt the coconut oil. Stir in the olive and and canola oils. Let the oils cool.

5. Very carefully add your cooled lye mixture to your oils, and blend with a stick blender until it reaches light trace. This will look like thin pudding.

6. Sprinkle cocoa powder over the soap and then blend well. Once the cocoa powder is blended in, add the peppermint oil and blend again. Finally, blend in the coffee.

7. Carefully pour into your mold.

8. Wait 3 days, and then you may slice your soap.

9. Set your soap in a well ventilated area and cure for 6 weeks, turning your soap every so often to ensure even drying.

Enjoy!

Help me out! Which soap?

I’m getting ready to start several batches of cold process soap for Christmas gift giving. They will each have to cure for six weeks, so I need to start very, very soon. The problem is, I can’t decide what to make! Help me decide which three to make. Here are the choices:

Easy Orange Cold Process Soap Recipe

My friend, Brittany, is quite awesome. She’s my soap-making buddy, and though we each make soap on our own, I think its more fun to make soap together!

OrangeColdProcess

We got together about a month ago to make an easy batch with another friend of ours, and we ended up with this lovely, luscious, cold process soap that just makes me so happy I had to share it with you all.

We started with the basic formula from www.soapqueen.com, and then we tweaked it a bit, checking our recipe with Brambleberry’s lye calculator. This is a pretty nifty tool, by the way.

Make sure you have your safety gear!
Make sure you have your safety gear!

So here’s what you need for a 2 lb batch:

7.5 oz coconut oil

7.5 oz palm oil

7.5 oz olive oil

2.5 oz avocado oil

3.5 oz sodium hydroxide (lye)

8.25 oz prepared calendula tea (room temperature) – you can also use water

1.5 oz orange essential oil

2 tsp paprika

2 lb loaf mold (or whatever mold you would like)

Stick Blender

Safety Gear – Gloves & Goggles

Orange Essential Oil
Orange Essential Oil
Paprika is a natural way to give your soap a great, earthy orange color!
Paprika is a natural way to give your soap a great, earthy orange color!

If you have never made cold process soap before, I suggest you watch this quick video on lye safety.

To make your soap:

1. Line your molds with freezer paper (you don’t need to do this if you’re using silicone)

2. Put on your gloves and goggles.

3. In a heat safe bowl (not aluminum), carefully sprinkle your lye into your cooled calendula tea. Do this in a well ventilated area, and be very careful not to breath in the fumes. Stir the mixture until it is clear, and then set it in a safe place to cool.

4. In a separate, large, non-aluminum bowl, melt the coconut and palm oil to combine them. Stir in the olive and avocado oil.

5. Very carefully add your cooled lye mixture to your oils, and blend with a stick blender until it reaches light trace. This will look like thin pudding.

6. Sprinkle the paprika over your soap, and then blend well. Once your paprika is blended in, add your orange essential oil and blend again.

7. Carefully pour into your mold.

8. Wait 24 hours, and then you may slice your soap.

9. Set your soap in a well ventilated area and cure for 4 – 6 weeks, turning your soap every so often to ensure even drying.

Enjoy!

DSC_0027